1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. PCGS XF+

1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. PCGS XF+
1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. PCGS XF+
1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. PCGS XF+
1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. PCGS XF+

1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. PCGS XF+

1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. Mint Year: 1624 Mint Place: Tower Privy Mark: Trefoil. Denomination: Gold Laurel (20 Shillings = 1 Pound) - 4th Bust Type Condition.

Certified and graded by PCGS as XF Details: Tooled! Weight: 9.05gm Material: Gold! Obverse: Laureated and draped bust of James I as King of the Scots, England and Ireland left.

Shilling value as a roman numeral (XX = 20) to right. James by the Grace of God King of Great Britain, France and Ireland. Reverse: Crowned shield with squared composite coat-of-arms on long cross fleury which splits inner circle and legends.

Legend: FACIAM EOS IN GENTEM VNAM (privy mark: trefoil) Translated. I will make them (Scotland, England, Ireland and France) one nation! During the reign of James, the colonization of North America and the beginning of English dominance in the Americas started its course.

In 1607 Jamestown was founded in Virginia and in 1620 Plymouth in Massachusetts Bay Colony. During the next 150 years, England would fight with Spain, the Dutch, and France for control of the continent.

The Laurel was the third English gold coin with a value of twenty shillings or one pound produced during the reign of King James I. It was named after the laurel that the king is portrayed as wearing on his head, but it is considerably poorer in both quality and style than the Sovereign and Unite which preceded it. All the coins were produced at the Tower Mint in London. The laurel weighed 140.5 grains (9.1 grams or just under 0.3 troy ounce), less than the previous Unite but almost exactly the same as the Unite issued under Charles I. The earlier busts show considerably more detail of the king, who is looking to the left of the coin and has the value "XX" to the right, behind the kings' head.

The legend on the obverse reads IACOBUS D G MAG BRI FRA ET HIB REX -- James by the grace of God, of Britain France and Ireland King. The reverse shows a long cross over a crowned shield which shows the arms of the four countries, and the legend FACIAM EOS IN GENTEM UNAM ("I will make them one nation", from Ezekiel 37:22). James VI & I (19 June 1566 - 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI from 1567 to 1625, and King of England and Ireland as James I from 1603 to 1625. He became King of Scots as James VI on 24 July 1567, when he was just thirteen months old, succeeding his mother Mary, Queen of Scots. Regents governed during his minority, which ended officially in 1578, though he did not gain full control of his government until 1581. On 24 March 1603, as James I, he succeeded the last Tudor monarch of England and Ireland, Elizabeth I, who died without issue.

He then ruled the Kingdom of England, Scotland, and Ireland for 22 years, often using the title King of Great Britain, until his death at the age of 58. Under James, the "Golden Age" of Elizabethan literature and drama continued, with writers such as William Shakespeare, John Donne, Ben Jonson, and Sir Francis Bacon contributing to a flourishing literary culture.

James himself was a talented scholar, the author of works such as. True Law of Free Monarchies. Sir Anthony Weldon claimed that James had been termed "the wisest fool in Christendom", an epithet associated with his character ever since.

For all his flaws, James had never completely lost the affection of his people, who had enjoyed uninterrupted peace and comparatively low taxation during the Jacobean Era. "As he lived in peace, " remarked the Earl of Kellie, "so did he die in peace, and I pray God our king (Charles) may follow him". The earl prayed in vain: once in power, Charles and Buckingham sanctioned a series of reckless military expeditions that ended in humiliating failure. James bequeathed Charles a fatal belief in the divine right of kings, combined with a disdain for Parliament, which culminated in the English Civil War and the execution of Charles.

James had often neglected the business of government for leisure pastimes, such as the hunt; and his later dependence on male favourites at a scandal-ridden court undermined the respected image of monarchy so carefully constructed by Elizabeth. The stability of Jamesââ¬â¢s government in Scotland, however, and in the early part of his English reign, as well as his relatively enlightened views on religious issues and war, have earned him a re-evaluation from many recent historians, who have rescued his reputation from a tradition of criticism stemming back to the anti-Stuart historians of the mid-seventeenth century.

The item "1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin.

PCGS XF+" is in sale since Saturday, November 21, 2020. This item is in the category "Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\UK (Great Britain)\Gold".

The seller is "coinworldtv" and is located in Wien. This item can be shipped worldwide.
1624, Great Britain, James I. Scarce Gold Laurel (20 Shillings) Coin. PCGS XF+


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